First Steps on the Way to a Paperless Lifestyle

paperless lifestyle

As I look to the left of my monitor, I see a pile of mail on a shelf waiting to be ‘processed’ and another smaller pile of more urgent paper on my desk by my left hand. When I open the mail I quickly scan through the contents to see if anything needs urgent attention – usually not these days as most communication comes by email (yea, less paper!). The more important mail (e.g. credit card payments) goes on the pile on my desk and the less important stuff either goes straight to recycling or lands on that other larger pile of less important paper waiting on the shelf. And the two piles steadily grow and grow until I get round to dealing with them.

Well not any more. My big resolution for 2015 is to try to go paperless as much as I can and I’m looking forward to it. Why? Because I know I’m motivated enough to succeed on this one, and I know I have the tools to deal with it. What tools? Well Evernote and a scanner.

Evernote

Although I’ve had a free account with Evernote since early 2008, it’s only in the last couple of years that I’ve really ratcheted up what I store there. I’m confident they’ll be around in the long term so I’ve made a decision to go with them as my repository for paper and documents (among many other things) which I need to keep. I’ve had a Premium account for over a year now which means I don’t have to worry about monthly upload limits. By the way, the Premium monthly upload limit to Evernote is now a massive 4GB. My one big regret with Evernote is that there isn’t a native Linux version. I’ll go into my Evernote set up in a later post in this series.

Scanner

Until now, I’ve usually scanned documents to Evernote from a multifunction printer. I have a Canon MP280 MFP at the moment and I’ve blogged before about how its flatbed scanner can be used to add scanned documents to Evernote. In fact I could use virtually any scanner with Evernote as Evernote has a great feature to monitor and import from a folder or multiple folders on your PC or laptop. Anything that is scanned to a nominated folder or folders is automatically imported into a linked nominated folder in Evernote. To set this up in Evernote, just go to Tools, Import Folders and this dialogue box appears:

Evernote Import Folders

Once you’ve added a monitored folder on your PC or laptop, a copy of the scanned document is then sent to the nominated Evernote folder, in my case .Inbox.

Well that’s all fine but I’m serious about going paperless so I need something a little better than a flatbed scanner, which just takes one sheet at a time, and only scans one side of paper at a time (a simplex scanner). Even though it is possible to create multipage PDFs with this set up, to speed things up, I really need a duplex scanner (one which will simultaneously scan both sides of a sheet of paper) and a sheet feeder, although not a large one as I hope to keep on top of paper this time. Other questions I have to consider are does my scanner need to be portable and should I buy a scanner from Evernote.

Well I’ve made that decision and ordered a scanner and I’ll discuss my choice in the next post.

Do you have a pile of mail lying waiting to be dealt with? Have you gone paperless? How did you go about it? Let us know in the comments.

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